TUMUT, NSW.

AUSTRALIA

Talbingo Farming Area

"Talbingo" Index

Always in the back ground, guarding the Blowering Valley from the south.

BEAUTIFUL TUMUT. Gateway to Blowering - Talbingo and the Snowy Mtns

The branch line which runs east from Cootamundra terminates at Tumut, which Is delightfully situated on the banks of the Tumut River. Descending from the high mountains eastward of Tumut the river runs rapidly until It eventually reaches the steadier waters of the Murrumbidgee. Near the town it's banks are encompassed. In the drooping willows which provide many a shady nook for boating parties. Besides boating and swimming, there is ample sport with trout in the river. Coaches run regularly to tho Yarrangobilly Caves, via Talbingo Mountains, which in winter often wears a mantle of snow. There are many up-to-date hotels in the town. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Tuesday 26 September 1911.)

Talbingo - about 1924

The Day family - last owners of Talbingo Station never thought that this would be the scene !!!!

Historic village now a modern town

It is hard to write about Talbingo (which I knew very well as a child) without feeling that here, of all the places in the Snowy Mountains, is the one town which should have been protected from the ravages of Snowy Mountains Scheme. It was a tiny township full of fascinating history which extended far beyond its boundaries. It was the town where Miles Franklin, of My Brilliant Career fame, was born. The local Talbingo Hotel, apart from its wonderful bar sketch by Rufus Morris (the cartoonist famous for his work on the 'It's moments like these you need Minties'), was known for its trout fishing and its wildness which once extended to a man riding his horse into the main bar and shooting a hole in the roof with a shotgun. Ken Murray, at the time the successful publisher of Man and House and Garden magazines, built himself an eyrie on the top of a hill behind the town - it can still be seen from the lookout at Tumut Ponds Dam. And it was the beginning of one of the worst roads ever built in this country - a winding track which made its way via Yarrangobilly, Rules Point and Kiandra to Adaminaby and Cooma.

It was, by any measure, a beautiful place where the Talbingo and the Jounama creeks made their way through rugged country and the autumn colours of the willows and poplars beside the creeks were a joy to behold. Few people who experienced the area in childhood ever forgot it. Miles Franklin, in Childhood in Brindabella writes of Talbingo: 'No other spot has ever replaced the hold on my affections or imagination of my birthplace, nor are any other incidents so clearly and tenderly etched in my memory as those connected with it.' Elsewhere she wrote of the ferny gullies, to the sweet, and rush of many mountain waters'. Much of the magic of the area has been captured in Jack Bridle's excellent book Talbingo.

Autumn colours on Jounama Dam

Today Talbingo is a neat little township located on the foreshores of the Jounama Pond (it's really a dam) which lies at the bottom of the Tumut 3 Power Station. It is 462 km from Sydney, 42 km from Tumut and 412 metres above sea level. Like Khancoban to the south it nestles under the Snowy Mountains which rise immediately behind the town. The new town was originally one of the many camps established by the Snowy Mountains Authority but, being outside the Kosciusko National Park, it has not been subject to the restrictions which have been imposed on settlements like Jindabyne and Cabramurra. The houses in the township are now mostly privately owned and there are a number of privately owned businesses.

The town's past history is now drowned under the Jounama Dam. This is dramatically demonstrated by the sign on the way into town which reads 'Original Lampe Homestead - Birthplace of Miles Franklin in October 1879 - 500 metres'. Don't go looking for the homestead. The arrow which accompanies the '500 metres' indicates that what is left of the homestead is now under the waters of the Jounama Pond. In the same vicinity also lies the remnants of Talbingo Station.

It is worth recalling that Franklin's mother, who at the time was living in Brindabella some 100 km away, made the journey by horse and sulky to her parent's home, Lampe Homestead, to give birth.

HISTORICAL TEXT

WILLIAM BRIDLE was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1797, and arrived in Australia in 1815. He was employed for some time about Sydney, chiefly in agricultural work, and was one of the members of the first expedition, which, in the time of Governor Macquarie, crossed the Blue Mountains. For his services in this connection he was rewarded with a grant of land near Liverpool. Later he took up land on Manaro, and appears as the lessee of a run containing 12,000 acres, and known as Island Lake (now Wambrook), which was acquired later by Wallace and Ryrie. In 1848 he left Manaro for Talbingo. In 1866 he sold out his Talbingo property to Mr. Lampie. He died at Tumut in 1873. Bridle Creek, near Wambrook, takes its name from him.

"BACK TO COOMA" Felix Mitchell 1926 Page 74 - Transcribed by Pattrick Mould 2002 - (Lyn Langley)

The ex–convict William Bridle had arrived in 1848.

In 1866 Bridle sold out to Lampe who was Miles Franklin's grandfather. Lampe's property was known as Talbingo Station. It remained the centre of the community until the site was finally drowned by the filling of the Jounama Dam in 1968.

So what does the modern town have to offer? In Bridle Street there is a cairn and park commemorating the fact that Talbingo was the birth place of Miles Franklin.

Modern Talbingo is a town where the architectural style is very much 'SMA Construction Town circa 1960'.

Oakland on Long Run

The highest town in Australia, Kiandra, was visited recently by Mr. S. Plush, of Nuriootpa, who with five others and a large load of luggage, drove an Oakland car 2,160 miles through Berri, Mildura, Euston, Hay, Junee, and Talbingo to Koscuiosko, N.S.W., and back, in order to see the Blue Mountains. Floods in several towns on the way necessitated ploughing the car through mud for miles at a time. Although bogged several times, the car pulled but under its own power, and negotiated with ease a difficult patch of sand. At Talbingo (N.S.W.), a seven mile climb was made in second gear, and after visiting the Yarrangobilly Caves the party travelled on to Kiandra.

So cold was the atmosphere here that hot water had to be put in to start the car, and the brake bands were frozen to the drums. From Kosciusko the party went high up in the mountains, until a snowdrift made further progress an impossibility.

The return trip was made through Boomboola and Bairnsdale to Melbourne, thence through Mortlake, Hamilton, Mount Gambier, Kingston, and Strathalbyn, to Adelaide. - (Ref - The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912-1954) Saturday 4 July 1925).

TALBINGO STATION

John Oltmann LAMPE

John Maurice FRANKLIN

F G White

Geoff Hooper

Allan Day

George Day

Peter Gibb

BORAIG STATION

Ken G Murray

TALBINGO AREA
A Dunn

J T Dunn

Lyall Matchett

E Bush

Talbingo Hotel

Talbingo Hall

Talbingo School - closed

Talbingo Public School - (current)

Jack BRIDLE - Talbingo Caravan Park, Cabins & Service Station

The early resumptions

at Jones's Bridge, Wermatong and the West Blowering areas are * Indicated in a report listed in the NSW Government Gazette on 9th July 1965. This being their official notification of a date to restart their futures.

J.B.RIDLE - ? acres and C.A. DUNN - ? acres and W.J. MOOREHEAD - ? acres and J. RAMSBOTHAM - ? acres and Estate of the late W.J. & Mrs M.J & Mr B.M.) - 583 acres and T.B. GUY - 4 acres and Mrs H PETHER - 13 acres and E.W & H SMITH - 2 acres and Mrs E.M BROWN - 3 acres and A. DAY - 99 acres and Mrs A.N. BUSH - 4 acres and C.A. HUDSON - 5 acres and Mrs S ROBERTS - 1 acres and Mrs A.M. DOYLE - 22 acres and E.W. SIMMONDS - 2 acres and M.G. BUSH - 82 acres.

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

BRIDLE.-September 22, at Tumut. William Hendy Bridle, beloved father of Ethel, Tessie, and Madge Fix this text Bridle, and Beatrice Franklin. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Wednesday 24 September 1919).

To Home

THE NEW DIGGINGS AT THE SNOWY RIVER. The Goulburn Chronicle of Wednesday says:

The discovery of gold lately made at Gibson's Plain, near the source of the Snowy River, is beginning to attract considerable attention and from intelligence that has reached us from various sources, we are inclined to believe that in this instance a really payable gold field has been struck.

At the same time we should be the last to advise persons from a distance to repair their until the quality ot the field be placed beyond doubt. There are plenty of persons within easy distance to give the place a fair trial. Towards the close of last week, according to a letter received yesterday, there were already about 700 persons on the spot and numbers were hastening from various points in the surrounding districts.

The character of the new discovery cannot therefore long remain doubtful, and in the meantime those farther removed from the scene of operations would do well to await the result. We are informed that Gibson's Plain, the locality of the new field, extends for about fourteen miles and is not far from the source of tho Snowy River. It is about sixty miles from Cooma, and about fifty miles from Tumut but the route from Tumut is impracticable for drays. Gibson's Plain can be reached from Queanbeyan by a bridle road in fifty-five miles, but the Murrumbidgee has to be crossed twice. The best route is by way of Cooma.

The new goldfield, we are informed, can be approached by drays only within twelve miles; the remaning distance goods have to be conveyed by pack horses but probably a route may, he opened for drays. A number of drays laden with tools and supplies, have already started from Cooma and Queanbeyan, one storekeeper in the latter place having despatched no less than twelve.

The price of flour at the diggings at the last accounts was £60 a ton, and it had advanced in Cooma from £30 to £40. They were asking in Queanbeyan on Saturday twelve shillings a bushel for wheat. There is little fear, however, but that there will soon be abundance of supplies on the diggings.

There are already three slaughter-houses erected. One important fact in connexion with the new gold-field is, that in ordinary seasons it is expected it will only be workable from November to May, say seven mouths in the year; the remaining five months the place is covered with snow to a depth variously stated at from four or five to twenty feet.

It is supposed to be an extension of the line of gold-fields comprising the Buckland, the Ovens, Tumberumba, and Adelong, and forms a portion of that tract of country on the Australian Alps which was pronounced to be auriferous by the Rev W B Clarke, the geologist. The test of a gold-field, however, in the eyes of the public, will of course be the amount of gold produced; and until some considerable quantity finds its way to the Mint, the reputation of Gibson's Plain as a payable gold-field will not rest on a solid foundation. We may state that Mr Maurice Harnett, who resides near Cooma, passed through Goulburn on Saturday last, with sixteen ounces of gold from the new field, which is intended for assay at the Mint. The gold is nuggetty, bright and clean. We hear that the first party at work on the field have obtained four lbs weight, and that two men, one of whom is named Russell, obtained in part of two days no less than four ounces. The sinking at present is from three to six feet; the diggers at the last accounts were sluicing in the river and tributary creeks, and no shafts had yet been sunk.

We understand that an official report from the nearest magistrate, Mr W Graham, went down on Saturday night with a view to the proclamation of the new gold-field, which will no doubt take place at once. Since writing the above we have seen a letter received in Goulburn from Tumut, under date 22nd instant.

The writer says that the diggers are leaving Adelong Reef in hundreds for the new gold-field at Gibson's Plain. Even the Port Curtis rush did not make such a stir. The new diggings, he says may be reached on horseback from Tumut in about fifty miles, and many are going that way, but drays cannot take that route as they, cannot cross the Talbingo hill. Drays are going by way of Tumberumba and Meragle, though the distance by that route is about 120 miles. Some Adelong people have visited the new field, and returned, reporting it is very good. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 28 January 1860)

SUPREME COURT OF NEW SÖUTH WALES. i EccmtsiASTicai. JuntsmcTioK.:

In the Intestate Eatate- ot JAMES NEWMAN, late of Talbingo, deceased. CREDITORS are to forward to mo (through the Post Office if they think fit), at my Office, Chancery-square, Supreme Court Branch, Sydney, tbolr claims for proof, verified by affidavit, on or before the Btlt day of January next, or they will bc excluded: from all benefit from Ibis Estate. Creditors may, however, if they prefer it, forward In the same way their claim to my Agent, H. S. HAWKINS, of 'Tumut, ao aa to be received from him by me, for proof, by the time above named. THEO. POWELL, . Curator of Intestate Estates. 8th December, 1890. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Tuesday 9 December 1890).

1860 - SALES OF CROWN LANDS will be held at the undermentioned places, on the days stated: SALE AT THE POLICE OFFICE, TUMUT. - On Monday, November 26, 1860.

COUNTRY LOTS.

Lot 1,33 acres ;

lot 2, 46 acres ;

lot 3, 43 acres ;

lot 4, S3 acres ;

lot 5, 45 acres 1 rood ;

lot C 24 acres, 1 rood 32 porches ;

lot 7, 32 acres;

lots8 and 9,each45 acres;

lots IO to 12, each 40 acres ;

lot 13, 09acres;

lot 14,61 acres;

lot 15, CO acres 1 rood ;

lot 1C, 38 acres 3 roods ;

lot 17, OG acres 1 rood ;

lot 18, 89 acres ;

lot 19, 54 aores ;

lot 20,40 acres ;

lot 21,'23 acres 8 roods 13 porches;

lot 22, 23 acres 33 perches;

lot 23, 40 acres; lot '24, 60 acres;

lot 25, 40 acres ;

lot 26, 22 aores 1 rood 8 perohes ;

lot 27, 31 acres 1 rood 16 porches :

lot 26, 64 acres ;

lot 29, 54 acres 1 rood, county of Buccleuch, parish of Yarrangobilly, near the village Reserve at Yarrangobilly, on and near the Yarrangobilly River, about 28 miles south-easterly from Tumut.

Lot 30, 15 acres 8 perohes;

lot 31, 23 aores 2 roods 33 perohes:

lot 32, 2G acres 1 rood 30 perohes ; lot 33, 30 aerea 3 roods 9 perches ; lot 34, 30 acres 2G perches ; lot SS, 35 acres 2 roods ; lot 36, 32 aerea 3 roods ; lot 37, 30 aores; county of Buccleuch, parish of Talbingo, on and near the left bank of Jounama Creek, near its confluence with the Tumut River, at Talbingo. Lithographie plans of these lands can be obtained at the Police Office, Tumut, and also at tho Surveyor General's Office, Sydney, on payment of one shilling each.

Lot 38, 141 acres,Community of Buccleuch, parish of Brungle, within the Brungle reserve between J. Bray's 115 acres 3 roods and his 145 aores. Lithographic plans of thia portion may be obtained aa the Police Office, Tumut, on payment of aaa shilling each.

Lot 39, 91 acros 3 roods;

lot 40, 83 acres 1 rood;

lot 41 68 acres; lot 42,42 acres;

lot 43, 100 ocrea 2 roods;

lot 44, 99 acres;

lot 40, 98 acres;

lot 40, 94 acres;

lot 47, 103 acres;

lot 48, 83 acres;

lot 49, 04 acres;

lot 50, 88 sores 3 roods;

lot 61, 168 acres 3 roods;

lot 52, 165 acres 1 rood;

lot 63, 101 acres 2 roods;

lot 54,60 acres 8 roods: >p>lot 55, 80 aoros 8 roods, county of Buccleuch, parish of Killimicat, on and near the right bank of tho Tumut River, opposite Broughtons portions, between 4 and C8miles below Tumut. Lithographic plans of those lands maybe obtained at the Police Office, Tumut, and at the Survoyor General's Office, Sydney, on payment of one shilling eaoh.

Upset price, £1 per acre. - (Ref- Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 24 October 1860).

Talbingo.

The trout hatechories here have already justified their construction, under the care of Mr. Henry Pettier the young fish are doing splendidly and are growing rapidly. They are fed on ground boiled liver. The intention of the Fisheries Board in establishing these hatcheries is to stock the Tumut River with large fish when they have grown to a size that will enable them to hold their own against larger fish in these waters. If they are liberated sooner the cod fish and perch will kill them. To test whether the trout takes fright from noise or from the bight of objects, a party went to the ponds lately and while they remained, still they could converse to further orders without disturbing the fish, but immediately any slight movement was made they, glided off.

Talbingo is growing, Mr Pether is adding a large dining hall, 20ft x 18ft, to his already commodious hotel premises, in anticipation of the increased tourist and trout fishing traffic. Mr. Julius Forsstrom, of Lobbs Hole copper fame, is building a pisi cottage on land he recently purchased from Mrs. Lampe. He has cleared the land and planted 100 fruit trees, and put an area of it under corn.

It is computed by the tallies of fish taken from the trout-fishing streams in this neighborhood that last season 1500 fish over the regulation size were landed. This year they will be more plentiful than ever. Even now, in the immediate surroundings of the hotel, they are to be seen rising at any time.

Some time ago it was announced that the Government had granted. £250 for a road to the Buddong Falls, but since nothing seems to have been done in the matter. If sightseers are to have the benefit of easy access to this picturesque region during the coming tourist season, it is high time a move was made towards opening up a servicable route. It is indeed a pity that so much neglect or apathy should be shown over an important matter of this kind. When the Government were so prompt in acceding to the request for a special grant for this road it was thought similar expedition would be made by those who are responsible for the expenditure of the money. - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 15 October 1907 Page 3).

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

The Web Search this website only

Talbingo Email Print Normal font Large font February 8, 2004 Destination: New South Wales Australia Things to see Tourist Information Motels Caravan Parks Restaurants Caf?s Advertisement Advertisement Talbingo Historic village now a modern town It is hard to write about Talbingo (which I knew very well as a child) without feeling that here, of all the places in the Snowy Mountains, is the one town which should have been protected from the ravages of Snowy Mountains Scheme. It was a tiny township full of fascinating history which extended far beyond its boundaries. It was the town where Miles Franklin, of My Brilliant Career fame, was born. The local Talbingo Hotel, apart from its wonderful bar sketch by Rufus Morris (the cartoonist famous for his work on the 'It's moments like these you need Minties'), was known for its trout fishing and its wildness which once extended to a man riding his horse into the main bar and shooting a hole in the roof with a shotgun. Ken Murray, at the time the successful publisher of Man and House and Garden magazines, built himself an eyrie on the top of a hill behind the town - it can still be seen from the lookout at Tumut Ponds Dam. And it was the beginning of one of the worst roads ever built in this country - a winding track which made its way via Yarrangobilly, Rules Point and Kiandra to Adaminaby and Cooma. It was, by any measure, a beautiful place where the Talbingo and the Jounama creeks made their way through rugged country and the autumn colours of the willows and poplars beside the creeks were a joy to behold. Few people who experienced the area in childhood ever forgot it. Miles Franklin, in Childhood in Brindabella writes of Talbingo: 'No other spot has ever replaced the hold on my affections or imagination of my birthplace, nor are any other incidents so clearly and tenderly etched in my memory as those connected with it.' Elsewhere she wrote of the 'ferny gullies, to the sweet, and rush of many mountain waters'. Much of the magic of the area has been captured in Jack Bridle's excellent book Talbingo. Today Talbingo is a neat little township located on the foreshores of the Jounama Pond (it's really a dam) which lies at the bottom of the Tumut 3 Power Station. It is 462 km from Sydney, 42 km from Tumut and 412 metres above sea level. Like Khancoban to the south it nestles under the Snowy Mountains which rise immediately behind the town. The new town was originally one of the many camps established by the Snowy Mountains Authority but, being outside the Kosciusko National Park, it has not been subject to the restrictions which have been imposed on settlements like Jindabyne and Cabramurra. The houses in the township are now mostly privately owned and there are a number of privately owned businesses. The town's past history is now drowned under the Jounama Dam. This is dramatically demonstrated by the sign on the way into town which reads 'Original Lampe Homestead - Birthplace of Miles Franklin in October 1879 - 500 metres'. Don't go looking for the homestead. The arrow which accompanies the '500 metres' indicates that what is left of the homestead is now under the waters of the Jounama Pond. In the same vicinity also lies the remnants of Talbingo Station. It is worth recalling that Franklin's mother, who at the time was living in Brindabella some 100 km away, made the journey by horse and sulky to her parent's home, Lampe Homestead, to give birth. Oltmann Lampe was not the first settler in the valley. The ex–convict William Bridle had arrived in 1848. In 1866 Bridle sold out to Lampe who was Miles Franklin's grandfather. Lampe's property was known as Talbingo Station. It remained the centre of the community until the site was finally drowned by the filling of the Jounama Dam in 1968. So what does the modern town have to offer? In Bridle Street there is a cairn and park commemorating the fact that Talbingo was the birth place of Miles Franklin. Modern Talbingo is a town where the architectural style is very much 'SMA Construction Town circa 1960'. Things to see: The Interdenominational Church Built by the Snowy Mountains Authority and with a superb view over the Jounama Pond, the Church of St Paul was the first interdenominational church in Australia. Rumour has it that the SMA agreed to build one church in the new town thus forcing the local clergymen to come to a hasty compromise. The church was duly opened and dedicated on 23 April 1967 by a Church of England clergyman, a Roman Catholic priest and a Presbyterian minister. - the three denominations now share the facilities. Talbingo Reservoir There are boat-launching facilities and a beach area at the spillway. Waterskiing and swimming are permitted. Access is via Dam Wall Road. Boat hire is available from Talbingo Caravan Park, tel: (02) 6949 5239. Talbingo Adventure Company Camping and adventure equipment is available for hire or sale at this shop in Talbingo Shopping Centre. They cater to mountain biking, water sports, camping and sports, tel: (1800) 643 373. Jounama Lake Fishing is permitted around the edges of this lake which is situated in front of the township. Tumut 3 Power Station 5 km beyond the town (and clearly signposted) is the Tumut 3 Power Station which feeds water into the Jounama Pond. It generates electricity from the waters which flow from Talbingo Reservoir. The water comes down the hills in six pressure pipe lines and production of electricity is maximised by pumps in the power station which pump water back up the hill to Talbingo Reservoir during off peak periods. The power generated at Tumut 3 serves both New South Wales and Victoria. The power station has an operating capacity of 1 500 000 Kw making it the largest of all the Snowy Mountains power stations. It is open every day except Christmas Day and Good Friday and there are guided tours at 10.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m., midday, 1.30 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. There is also an interpretative area. The entrance fee is $10 for adults and $27 for a family of four. Concessions are $7 and there is a rate of $6 per person for groups of 15 or more. Day visitors require no booking but coach groups must book in advance. Open footwear is not permitted and visitors with pacemakers cannot participate, tel: (02) 6949 4115 or, for the information line, ring (1800) 623 776. Buddong Falls From the back of the power station there is a dry-weather-only road that leads to Buddong Falls where picnic tables, toilets and water are available. A steep walk provides access to the lower falls. It is about a one-hour return track but is slippery when wet. Tourist Information Tumut Region Visitor Centre Old Butter Factory 5 Adelong Rd, Tumut Talbingo NSW 2720 Telephone: (02) 6947 7025 Facsimile: (02) 6947 3752 Motels Country Club Motel Bridle St Talbingo NSW 2720 Telephone: (02) 6949 5260 Rating: *** Caravan Parks Talbingo Caravan Park Whitty St Talbingo NSW 2720 Telephone: (02) 6949 5239 Rating: ** Restaurants Country Club Chinese Restaurant Bridle St Talbingo NSW 2720 Telephone: (02) 6949 5260 Cafés Jounama Coffee Shop & Restaurant Talbingo Shopping Centre Talbingo NSW 2720 Telephone: (02) 6949 5231