Red Hill Station or Kiley's Run

"Red Hill Station or Kiley's Run "

was first settled in 1848 by

Patrick 1st Kiley

Area: ---

BIRTH

DEATH of Patrick

Patrick died at a private hospital in Cootamundra after a short illness on 11th December 1917.

PARENTS

William (1st) Kiley and Margaret Russell

MARRIAGE

In 4221/1875 Patrick (2nd) married Margaret Agnes Madigan.

DEATH of Margaret

Margaret died in 1911 and Patrick was heartbroken. There is a stained glass window in the Catholic church erected by Patrick Kiley of Red Hill dedicated to Margaret's memory.

CHILDREN

1. In 1875 their son John Richard Kiley was born. Eight more children were to come

2. Josephine

3. Ellenor

4. William Francis

5. Margaret Gertrude

6. Patrick (2nd) Joseph Kiley was born in Coolac, NSW in 1841.

7. Bridget

8. Louis Phillip and

9. Lucy

Other Male Marriages in Tumut with the surname KILEY

5389/1905 KILEY WILLIAM J married Miss HASTINGS CATHERINE A in TUMUT.

4238/1875 KILEY MAURICE married Miss MCINTOSH NORA MARY in TUMUT

5088/1880 KILEY EDWARD married Miss CONNOLLY, SARAH in TUMUT

7003/1893 KILEY JAMES married Miss KELLY ELIZA in TUMUT

4221/1875 KILEY PATRICK married Miss Mary MADIGAN in TUMUT

Patrick (2nd) and the Wiradjuri people

It is said that Patrick was able to speak Wiradjuri, the language of the local Aboriginal people. Brungle was the mission where the Aboriginal people lived. Brungle is not far from Kiley's run.

Patrick as an employer. Aboriginal men and women would walk along the zig zag trail from Brungle to Kiley's run, where they would find work. Patrick Kiley was a man ahead of his time. Patrick paid Aboriginal people working for him wages equal to his white employees. Patrick made this a tradition on his property, as Fred Campbell who owned it after him also paid equal wages to Aboriginal workers as did the next owner T A Fields.

Vincent Bulger, an Aboriginal man from Brungle village worked as a stockman on Kileys run from 1947 until the mid 1950's. You can find more information on Vincent Bulger in this book: High Country Footprints: Aboriginal Pathways and Movement in the High Country of Southeastern Australia, Recognising the Ancient Paths Beside Modern Highways . Peter K

SALE of PROPERTY

In 1915, after years of drought, the property was sold to Frederick Campbell and the family moved to 'Darah', Wallendbeen.

DEATH

PASTORALISTS DEATH The death ocourred at Cootamundra, after a brief Illness, of Mr. Patrick (2nd) Kiley, of "Darah" station, Wallendbeen, aged 75 years. Mr. Kiley was well known in pastoral circles, and was at one time owner of Red Hill station, Tumut. His wife predeceased him in 1911. A family of four sons and five daughters survive him. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 26 December 1917).

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KILEY JOHN 20563/1875 parents PATRICK & MARGARET AGNES in TUMUT

KILEY LUCY V 35354/1892 parents PATRICK & MARGARET in TUMUT

KILEY JOSEPHINE 21508/1877 parents PATRICK & MARGARET AGNES M in TUMUT

KILEY ELLEN 24344/1879 parents PATRICK & MARGARET in TUMUT

KILEY WILLIAM F 27572/1881 parents PATRICK & MARGARET in TUMUT

KILEY PATRICK J 33554/1885 parents PATRICK & MARGARET in TUMUT

KILEY LOUIS P 34370/1890 parents PATRICK & MARGARET in TUMUT

WORK

AUSTRALIAN HISTORY

William (1st) elder brother Patrick (1st) was a convict and was transported to Australia for 7 years, arriving on the 'Minerva' in 1819.

William and Margaret came to Coolac, NSW where Patrick, having completed his term, and his wife Julia were living.

William and Margaret were living at Billy Creek (Adjungbilly). This is probably the Spring Creek Run, which may have been incorporated into Red Hill Run also known as Kiley's Run.

According to the Centenary Book, Church of the Immaculate Conception, Tumut... "During the Kiandra gold rush, Patrick (2nd) and his brother Edward The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995)(about) Previous issue Thursday 3 July 1986 Next issue Previous page Page 1)

Group fights to preserve Kiley's Run

By MICHAEL FOSTER

Australia is in danger of losing another segment of its national heritage, and at a cost at least $1 million above its real value, according to the newly elected president of the Kilcy's Run Preservation Committee.

Mr James Hawthorn had come down from the mountains on Tuesday in an effort to generate public protest against the $4.99 million acquisition of the 9086-hcctarc property, Red Hill station, by the NSW Forestry Commission - the day before it was to go to public auction.

The committee was formed, and Mr Hawthorn elected president, at a meeting at Tumorrama Hall on last Sunday. The committee secretary, Mrs Lesley Bocquct, said on Tuesday another meeting would be held at the Adjungbilly Hall at 1pm on Sunday. Mr Hawthorn said that residents were unani mous in their concern that a valuable and profitable agricultural property should be sold to extend pine forest plantings. Had it gone to auction and sold at true value it would have brought at least $1 million less than had been paid, which meant that taxpayers' money had been wasted at a time when all calls were for restraint.

The property, Kiley's Run in the Banjo Patcrson poem of the same name, was also part of Australia's history and heritage. In a statement on behalf of the committee, Mrs Bocquct said residents were also worried about the effect of the sale on rates, roads, schools, and local and seasonal employment. They also were worried about the prospect of pine plantations being de veloped on viable agricultural land.

People interested in Sunday's meeting, or wishing to contact the committee, could call Mrs Bocquct on (069) 466262. The committee has formulated a petition objecting to the sale and raising other subjects such as interest rates paid, bush fire potential, the harbouring of feral and destructive animals and noxious weeds.

The property was one of a parcel of four in NSW owned by an Englishman. It was to have been auctioned in Sydney on June 19. Several local graziers were interested in the auction and several had arranged finance to back their bids.

Patrick was later a mate of Banjo Paterson, who is believed to have spent some time on Red Hill Station and to have used it as the model for his poem as 'Kiley's Run', although others dispute this claim.

Mr Kiley, of Red Hill, says his ewes are doing remarkably well on his rented country at Narandera. He expects to start them home by the middle of Semptember.

DEATH

William died on the 1st February 1882 at Spring Creek, Brungle, he was 76 years old. - (Ref- http://www.squidoo.com/kileysrun#module14667202).

A. B. ("Banjo") Paterson (1864-1941)

Brief Biography - Andrew Barton Paterson was born at "Narrambla" Station near Orange in New South Wales in 1864. He grew up near Yass in NSW and attended school in the small town of Binalong, and later in Sydney.

He started out as a lawyer's clerk before being admitted as a solicitor. After the publication of The Man From Snowy River and Other Verses in 1895, he became something of a literary celebrity in Australia. He travelled widely throughout the country and also was war correspondent in the Boer War in South Africa, and covered the Boxer Rebellion in China.

He was later to become editor of the Sydney Evening News and then the Australian Town and Country Journal. At the outbreak of WWI he travelled to Europe to cover the conflict but was unable to get to the front in France. Frustrated by this he returned to Australia and joined the Remount Service which supplied horses for the Australian cavalry in the Middle East.

After the War he returned to Sydney, journalism and writing poetry and prose. Paterson is best remembered as the the author of "Waltzing Matilda - Australia's unofficial national anthem."

Bibliography

Poetry Collections

The Man From Snowy River and Other Verses 1895

Rio Grande's Last Race and Other Verses 1902

Saltbush Bill J.P. and Other Verses 1917

Collected Verse 1923

Singer of the Bush (complete works 1885-1900) 1983

Song of the Pen (complete works 1901-41) 1983

Banjo Paterson A Children's Treasury 1984, illustrated by Dee Huxley

The Geebung Polo Club 1984, illustrated by Ninon Phillips

Banjo Paterson's People 1987, paintings by Dorothy Gauvin

Banjo Paterson's Australians 1989, paintings by Dorothy Gauvin

Snowy River Riders 1991, paintings by Robert Lovett

Novels

An Outback Marriage 1906

The Shearer's Colt 1936

Short Story Collections

Three Elephant Power and Other Stories 1917

Childrens

The Animals Noah Forgot 1933

Non-Fiction

Happy Dispatches 1934

From the Front - Dispatches from the Boer War 2000, edited by R.W.F. Drooglever

Edited

Old Bush Songs 1905

ON KILEY'S RUN by A.B. "Banjo" Paterson

The roving breezes come and go

On Kiley's Run,

The sleepy river murmurs low,

And far away one dimly sees

Beyond the stretch of forest trees --

Beyond the foothills dusk and dun --

The ranges sleeping in the sun

On Kiley's Run.

'Tis many years since first I came

To Kiley's Run,

More years than I would care to name

Since I, a stripling, used to ride

For miles and miles at Kiley's side,

The while in stirring tones he told

The stories of the days of old

On Kiley's Run.

I see the old bush

homestead now

On Kiley's Run,

Just nestled down beneath the brow

Of one small ridge above the sweep

Of river-flat, where willows weep

And jasmine flowers and roses bloom,

The air was laden with perfume

On Kiley's Run.

We lived the good old station life

On Kiley's Run,

With little thought of care or strife.

Old Kiley seldom used to roam,

He liked to make the Run his home,

The swagman never turned away

With empty hand at close of day

From Kiley's Run.

We kept a racehorse now and then

On Kiley's Run,

neighb'ring stations brought their men

To meetings where the sport was free,

And dainty ladies came to see

Their champions ride; with laugh and song

The old house rang the whole night long

On Kiley's Run.

The station hands were friends I wot

On Kiley's Run,

A reckless, merry-hearted lot --

All splendid riders, and they knew

The `boss' was kindness through and through.

Old Kiley always stood their friend,

And so they served him to the end

On Kiley's Run.

But droughts and losses came apace

To Kiley's Run,

Till ruin stared him in the face;

He toiled and toiled while lived the light,

He dreamed of overdrafts at night:

At length, because he could not pay,

His bankers took the stock away

From Kiley's Run.

Old Kiley stood and saw them go

From Kiley's Run.

The well-bred cattle marching slow;

His stockmen, mates for many a day,

They wrung his hand and went away.

Too old to make another start,

Old Kiley died -- of broken heart,

On Kiley's Run.

The owner lives in England now Of Kiley's Run.

He knows a racehorse from a cow;

But that is all he knows of stock:

His chiefest care is how to dock

Expenses, and he sends from town

To cut the shearers' wages down

On Kiley's Run.

There are no neighbours anywhere

Near Kiley's Run.

The hospitable homes are bare,

The gardens gone; for no pretence

Must hinder cutting down expense:

The homestead that we held so dear

Contains a half-paid overseer

On Kiley's Run.

All life and sport and hope have died

On Kiley's Run.

No longer there the stockmen ride;

For sour-faced boundary riders creep

On mongrel horses after sheep,

Through ranges where, at racing speed,

Old Kiley used to `wheel the lead'

On Kiley's Run.

There runs a lane for thirty miles

Through Kiley's Run.

On either side the herbage smiles,

But wretched trav'lling sheep must pass

Without a drink or blade of grass

Thro' that long lane of death and shame:

The weary drovers curse the name

Of Kiley's Run.

The name itself is changed of late

Of Kiley's Run.

They call it `Chandos Park Estate'.

The lonely swagman through the dark

Must hump his swag past Chandos Park.

The name is English, don't you see,

The old name sweeter sounds to me

Of `Kiley's Run'.

I cannot guess what fate will bring

To Kiley's Run --

For chances come and changes ring --

I scarcely think 'twill always be

Locked up to suit an absentee;

And if he lets it out in farms

His tenants soon will carry arms

On Kiley's Run.

The Bulletin, 20 December 1890.

SALE of Property.

Red Hill Station or Kiley's Run

In 1915, after years of drought, the property was sold to Frederick Campbell and the family moved to 'Darah', Wallendbeen. Patrick died 11th December 1917.

The property was later purchased from Patrick Kiley by Fred Campbell of Yarralumla and Field of Lanyon, and in 1986 among much controversy was sold to the Forestry Commission to be planted with radiata pine. "Now in ruins, the home built from locally quarried basalt, boasted beautiful views, often admired from the veranda by Paterson." Woods, Kim. Dogs on farm essential. In Weekly times now. December 30, 2009

MAIL RUN Bookham, Chidowia, Bongongo, and Tumut, via Smith's, Kiley's, Red Hill, and Geary's, Wyangle once a week. Thomas Stevens, horseback, 1 year, £72 10s - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Monday 29 October 1888).

1888 - PASTORAL INTELLIGENCE. - [BY TELEGRAPH.} - FROM OUR CORRESPONDENTS.) GUNDAGAI, FRIDAY.

The following are the stock movements for the week:- 11,000 sheep from "Kooba" to "Red Hill" Brungle, P. Kiley owner, D. M'Gregor in charge.-

Adrah Point, Bland, travelling to Currangurambla H. Pearce owner, in charge; 14,000 sheep from Ulonga en route for Kiandra, T. Patterson owner. Cavanagh charge; 16,000 sheep from Temora, destination Yangangobilly - Blair and Company owners, Foster in charge 10,000 sheep from Mossgiel en route for Yarrangobilly - Stanbridge, Mills, and Waugh owners, Campbell in charge. 12,000 sheep from Gunbar station, to the mountains for summer country, Armstrong owner M'Cosanin charge; 3500 sheep from Hoolahan's Creek to the mountains, Alex Emery owner. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Saturday 10 November 1888).

1890 Young CIRCUIT COURT. - By telegraphy - from our correspondent - Young, WEDNESDAY. -

At the civil sittlngs of the above Court, opened before his Honor the Chief Justice on Monday, Patrick Kiley,

........................

Obituary - MR. EDWARD KILEY. - Particulars of the death of Mr Edward Kiley, father of Mrs. Maurice Madigan, of Queen's Villa Farm, Tumut, briefly reported in a late issue, are now to hand. Deceased had been ill only a fortnight, having first contracted a cold. One of his daughters, Mrs. Scott, who is a trained nurse, attended him, and although his condition was not considered critical, pneumonia set in, and despite the very best attention, he succumbed at 4.15 p.m. on July 28.

The late Mr. Kiley was 75 years of age, was a native of Tumut, being a son of the late Patrick Kiley sr, of Red Hill Station.

Upon the death of his father, he, with his brother Patrick, worked the Red Hill and Spring Creek Stations, and later on disposed of his interests to his brother, trekking to the Yass district where he took up a grazing property and followed stock-raising pursuits for 35 years.

From there he went to Temora and purchased Mr C. Schmidt's fine farm at Gidginbung, which he worked with his sons up till the time of his death.

Being of a retiring disposition, he was therefore not widely known in the Temora district, but was highly esteemed by all with whom he came in contact and his death is very much regretted by them, general sympathy being expressed for the bereaved widow and family of five daughters and two sons. The daughters are:

Mrs. A. W. Scott ('Molong,' Young), <>Mrs. Thorald Smith (Manly),

Mrs. Maurice Madigan (Tumut),

Mrs. J.M. O'Brien (Temora) and

Miss Lance Kiley (Temora), the sons being Messrs

Desmond and Ralph (Temora).

Mr. Maurice Kiley (deceased's brother) and his son Richard, of Spring Creek, Tumut, with Messrs J. and L. Kiley, of Darah, Cootamuudra, nephews, were present for the funeral.

The remains were laid to rest in the R.C. portion of the Temora Cemetery, Rev. Fr. Carragher officiating.

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William and Patrick Kiley of Kiley's Run

Updated on October 18, 2014

Pat Kiley's coat and shirt held in Gundagai Museum, along with a photo of the man himself

Early days

An entrepreneur and potential adventurer. Patrick "had been turned down for the Burke and Wills expedition to the interior because he was too young" — At Kiley's Run : a voice in the wilderness. Time, Jan 5 1987

"During the Kiandra gold rush, Patrick and his brother Edward conducted a profitable business taking flour by pack horse through the mountains to the diggings". — Centenary Book, Church of the Immaculate Conception, Tumut

Patrick and Banjo Patterson

Patrick was later a mate of Banjo Paterson, who is believed to have spent some time on Red Hill Station and to have used it as the model for his poem as 'Kiley's Run'.

Links

•Poem 'On Kiley's run' by Banjo Paterson

Read the poem written by Banjo Paterson about Kiley's Run

Family

In 1874 Patrick married Margaret Agnes Madigan.

In 1875 their son John Richard Kiley was born. Eight more children were to come

•Josephine grazier, of Red Hill, Tumut, sued A. G. Badgery, stock and station agent, for non-fulfilment of two contracts for the sale of 12,000 and 10,500 sheep.

Damages were laid at £5000. The venue was changed from Goulburn. Mr. Salomons and Mr. Heydon, instructed by Mossie, Slattery and Heydon, for plaintiff; Mr B. R. Wise, instructed by Mr. Davidson (Goulburn), for defendant; Mr. Gordon acting for Mr. Davidson on the first day. The sheep were sold to plantiff through Miller and Miller, of Cootamudra, acting as agents for Mr. A. G. Badgery. There were two sales- the first of 10,000 two-tooth wethers, on the loth August, 1839, at 6 71/2d, on approved bill six months, delivery in January, 1890; the second 10,000 (1 four-tooth wethers, at b\ purchased in September, for delivery on or before Novenber, on the same terms.

The whole question rested on what was regarded as an approved bill. Mr. Salumonn's opening address occupied an hour and a half on Monday morning. Plaintiff went into the box, his examination lasting the whole of the day. The cross-examation was directed to show that his financial position was not sound. The case was resumed on Wednesday. A number of witnesses interested in stock were called to prove the character of the sheep and the value at the time for taking delivery.

During the evidence on a question raised, his Honour Bald it was defendants duty to have informed the plaintiff that he would not take his (plaintiffs) bills at first, and give his reasons for not accepting the «aura. It was a question for the jury to say whether defendant could have refused plaintiffs bills, or whether defendent should not have given plaintiff time to get his bill endorsed.

Defendant had no right to resell tbe sheep until after the date for plaintiff to take delivery, when he could have objected to the bill. At the concluaion of the evldence a consultation was held, resulting in an order made by defendant's counsel £570 and all expenses, which was accepted. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Thursday 9 October 1890).

BUSH FIRES

1896 - LARGE BUSH FIRE - GREAT DAMAGE NEAR GUNDAGAI. SYDNEY, THURSDAY. - An extensive fire is raging in the neighbourhood of Gundagai. It first broke out between Red Hill and Kern Hill and swept across country in the direction of Yass, doing thousands of pounds worth of damage. The woolshed, stables, outhouses, and all the fences at Bongongo have disappeared, as well as the fences in the Jeremia country. Chidowla, belonging to Mr. I. Roche, has been devastated. Mr. Jamieson's Gundagai run has been burnt out, and many sheep have been destroyed; while at Mr. W. B. Smith's Darbalara Station 5000 acres of grass has been consumed and a number of sheep have perished.- (Ref- The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956)(about) Previous issue Friday 10 January 1896).

1902 - BUSH FIRE. - THE OUTBREAKS IN THE GUNDAGAI DISTRICT. - GUNDAGAI. Tuesday. - Owing to the continuous dry weather bush fires are still prevalent details in connection with the Bongongo fire show that close on 7000 acres of grass and many miles of fencing were destroyed. The fire started on P Kiley's Red Hill station, and travelled a distance of eight miles to the boundary of Messrs Pierse Brothers' place, Tomorroma. A few head of stock were lost. The fire jumped Adjungbilly Creek and got onto Mr Jones's property, burning a considerable portion of his grass, but with difficulty his residence was saved. Mr Kiley lost 4000 acres of grass Mr Biffen about l5OO acres, and Mr Jones 600 acres.

The bush fire near Adelong, from Billapalap station to Upper Adelong consumed about 20,000 acres of grass and many miles of fencing. Mr Robert Wiles while engaged on a fire on Saturdav 1ast was injured by a burning tree. The fire which broke out on Mount Horeb station was checked before much damage was done. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 12 February 1902).

To Home page - To Brungle - To Bush Fires

William and Patrick Kiley of Kiley's Run

Updated on October 1884 - Pat Kiley's coat and shirt held in Gundagai Museum, along with a photo of the man himself Source: ashroc

William and Patrick Kiley

William Kiley was a direct ancestor of mine who came to Australia from County Cork in Ireland.

His son Patrick was the owner of Red Hill (Kiley's run), a station near Tumut, NSW.

Red Hill station was made famous in Banjo Patersons poem 'On Kiley's run'.

Here you will find biographical information on William and Patrick who lived on Red Hill station.

Red Hill Station more famously known as Kiley's Run

Red Hill Station at Adjungbilly, 32 km from Gundagai was first settled in 1848 by William Kiley.

The property was later purchased from Patrick Kiley by Fred Campbell of Yarralumla and Field of Lanyon, and in 1986 among much controversy was sold to the Forestry Commission to be planted with radiata pine.

"Now in ruins, the home built from locally quarried basalt, boasted beautiful views, often admired from the veranda by Paterson." — Woods, Kim. Dogs on farm essential. In: Weekly times now. December 30, 2009

William Kiley

William Kiley was born in Ireland around 1806. He married Margaret Russell, a widow, in 1837 and they migrated to Australia in 1839, arriving on the ship the "Navarino".

The shipping list says William was the son of Seamus? (agriculturalist) and Catherine Kiley. William was catholic who could read and was of very good health. His age on embarkation was thirty but 'does not know when'.

William's elder brother Patrick was a convict and was transported to Australia for 7 years, arriving on the 'Minerva' in 1819. William and Margaret came to Coolac, NSW where Patrick, having completed his term, and his wife Julia were living.

William and Margaret's first son,

William was born at Coolac and also the second son

Patrick. Patrick was born in 1841.By the time the 3rd child,

Johanna was born on 13 April 1843,

William and Margaret were living at Billy Creek (Adjungbilly). This is probably the Spring Creek Run, which may have been incorporated into Red Hill Run also known as Kiley's Run.

William and Margaret had 5 more children.

Catherine born in 1845,

Edward born in 1847, married Sarah - daughter Ruth, born in Yass in 1888, who married Maurice Madigan of Tumut.She died

Matthew born in 1848,

Maurice born in 1851 and

James born in 1853.

William died on the 1st February 1882 at Spring Creek, Brungle, he was 76 years old.

Early days - An entrepreneur and potential adventurer

Patrick "had been turned down for the Burke and Wills expedition to the interior because he was too young" — At Kiley's Run : a voice in the wilderness. Time, Jan 5 1987 “

"During the Kiandra gold rush, Patrick and his brother Edward conducted a profitable business taking flour by pack horse through the mountains to the diggings". — Centenary Book, Church of the Immaculate Conception, Tumut

Patrick and Banjo Patterson

Patrick was later a mate of Banjo Paterson, who is believed to have spent some time on Red Hill Station and to have used it as the model for his poem as 'Kiley's Run'.

Links

•Poem 'On Kiley's run' by Banjo Paterson Read the poem written by Banjo Paterson about Kiley's Run

In 1915, after years of drought, the property was sold to Frederick Campbell and the family moved to 'Darah', Wallendbeen. Patrick died at a private hospital in Cootamundra after a short illness on 11th December 1917.

There are descendants of Patrick's family who live in the Cootamundra area today.

Patrick and the Wiradjuri people

It is said that Patrick was able to speak Wiradjuri, the language of the local Aboriginal people. Brungle was the mission where the Aboriginal people lived. Brungle is not far from Kiley's run.

Patrick as an employer

Aboriginal men and women would walk along the zig zag trail from Brungle to Kiley's run, where they would find work.

Patrick Kiley was a man ahead of his time. Patrick paid Aboriginal people working for him wages equal to his white employees. Patrick made this a tradition on his property, as Fred Campbell who owned it after him also paid equal wages to Aboriginal workers as did the next owner T A Fields.

Vincent Bulger, an Aboriginal man from Brungle village worked as a stockman on Kileys run from 1947 until the mid 1950's.

You can find more information on Vincent Bulger in this book:

High Country Footprints : Aboriginal Pathways and Movement in the High Country of Southeastern Australia, Recognising the Ancient Paths Beside Modern Highways . Peter Kabaila (interviewer), 2005; (p. 54-55)

Brungle, new south wales - Brungle NSW 2722, Australia [get directions]

Save Kiley's run!

In 1986 a group was formed to save Kiley's run. The Kiley's Run Preservation Committee was concerned at possibly losing a segment of Australia's history. The property, was to be purchased by the NSW Forestry Commission. The local residents were worried about a pine plantation on agricultural land.

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Patrick Kiley : an Irish convict

Patrick Kiley was a convict transported to Australia.

Patrick Kiley - was born in Ireland in approx 1799. His father was Sheamus and his mother was Catherine.

Patrick was tried for larceny in the county of Tipperary in 1819 and received the sentence of 7 years transportation to Australia. On the shipping list, Patrick is described as a labourer, 5 foot 6 inches tall with a pale complexion, black hair and blue eyes

Patrick was transported on the ship Minerva, which sailed from Cork on the 26th August 1819. They would have sailed from County Cork's port, Cobh (pronouned Cove).

The Minerva arrived in Sydney on the 17th December 1819. Around 170 male convicts were on board and one convict died on the voyage. This was the second voyage for the Minerva to Australia as a convict ship, she sailed by direct route which took 113 days.

The master of the ship was Captain John Bell. The surgeon was Superintendant Charles Queade. Lieutenant Harrison of the 45th Regiment was in charge of the soldiers on board the ship.

The Minerva was built in Lancaster in the year 1804 and weighed 530 tonnes. The plaque refers to the 1798 upsrising, but many more Irishmen and women left the shores of Ireland from Cob since that date. and indeed"... they subsequently influenced the development of the democratic and egalitarian ethos of the Australian nation".

The Minervaconducted a profitable business taking flour by pack horse through the mountains to the diggings". In 1864 they were able to buy "Red Hill".

Convict assignment

Captain Bunker of Argyle is given as Patrick's employer in the 1822 muster records. Captain Eber Bunker, a mariner, was an important man in the colony. He owned property at Collingwood Dale, Liverpool. Many convicts ended up workiing on his house and land. The house, having served many purposes since its construction. including a golf clubhouse, is now a heritage listed site.

Who was Captain Eber Bunker? - •Australian Dictionary of Biography

BUNKER, EBER (1761-1836), sea captain and farmer, was born on 7 March 1761 at Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States of America ...

Life as a free man

On the 6th April 1826 Patrick received his certificate of freedom. A Certificate of Freedom was a document stating that a convict's sentence had been served and was usually given to convicts with a 7, 10 or 14 year sentence

After his sentance, Patrick lived at Bongarry, Goulburn Plains and according to the 1828 census he owned 75 head of cattle.

In 1833 Patrick married Judith Moriarty (of the ship Woodman) at Carryyone (Kuriong station) 200 miles from Sydney, in the parish of Sydney, St Mary's. This information comes from the priest's journal. Kuriong Run is located near Binalong, NSW

Patrick and Judith settled at Coolac, NSW. In 1839, Patrick's younger brother William and his wife Margaret came out to Australia and joined the Kiley's at Coolac. Patrick and Judith were godparents to William's second son named Patrick.

In 1848 Patrick claimed a lease to Benangaroo Run (near Junee)

"Twelve thousand eight hundred acres [estimated area]. Estimated grazing capabilities, five hundred cattle. Bounded on the west by a range of mountains running from the Murrumbidgee River towards the Port Phillip road, which divides it from Mr. O'Brien's run; east by the main range running into the river, about two miles east of Kiley's hut, which divides it from Mr. Flood's run; south, the Murrumbidgee River; north by the ranges between the river and Port Phillip road." — the Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 3 October 1848

Under the shadow of Kiley's hill by Banjo Paterson

In the family it is said that this poem was written with Patrick Kiley in mind

Under the Shadow of Kiley's Hill

This is the place where they all were bred;

Some of the rafters are standing still;

Now they are scattered and lost and dead, Every one from the old nest fled, Out of the shadow of Kiley's Hill. Better it is that they ne'er came back -- Changes and chances are quickly rung; Now the old homestead is gone to rack, Green is the grass on the well-worn track Down by the gate where the roses clung. Gone is the garden they kept with care; Left to decay at its own sweet will, Fruit trees and flower-beds eaten bare, Cattle and sheep where the roses were, Under the shadow of Kiley's Hill. Where are the children that strove and grew In the old homestead in days gone by? One is away on the far Barcoo Watching his cattle the long year through, Watching them starve in the droughts and die. One, in the town where all cares are rife, Weary with troubles that cramp and kill, Fain would be done with the restless strife, Fain would go back to the old bush life, Back to the shadow of Kiley's Hill. One is away on the roving quest, Seeking his share of the golden spoil; Out in the wastes of the trackless west, Wandering ever he gives the best Of his years and strength to the hopeless toil. What of the parents? That unkempt mound Shows where they slumber united still; Rough is their grave, but they sleep as sound Out on the range as in holy ground, Under the shadow of Kiley's Hill. A B Banjo Paterson

TUMUT NEWS. LFBOU OUB 00BRZ9P0NDEST.] LICENSING CODET. Tuesday, Jan. 31. (Before the Fbliee Magistrate.} A CERTIFICATE was granted to Mr. John Beale, brewer, Tumut. A certificate was granted to Messrs. L. Man delson and Co., wine and spirit merchants, Tumut. A certificate was granted to same firm for Adolong. A certificate was granted to Mr. W. Budd, wine and spirit merchant, Adelong.

Regarding the late Rev. O. Twomey, the Southern Argus of Saturday last supplies the following particulars: — 'He was educated in All-Hallows Collogo, Dublin. Ordained in 1852, in the following year ho came to labour in the cause of religion in New South Wules, where for very nigh thirty yoars his efforts for the cause he espoused wore unceasing, and his zeal unabated. He labored on the mission in Albury for several years; then ho was removed to Tumut, where his zeal has left monuments which will ever keep fresh in tho mouory of his flook his untiring exertions for their spiritual good. The Church of the Immaculate Concep tion at TumuVtu one of the finest in the diocese of Goulburn. -Some fortnight ago Father Tvomey left for Melbourne fora short vacation, whioh, contrary to expectation, proved to be his last. On Wednesday morning he peacefully and calmly breathed his last, after a very holy and thoroughly priestly life Bpent in the service of his Master. He was buried in Melbourne on Thursday, and as his Lordship could uot be present on tho occasion, a solemn High Mass waa celebrated in the Cathedral, Goulburn, for. the eternal repose of his soul. His Lordship Sr. .Lanigan was oelnbrant, the Bev. p. J. O'Keeffe and Eev. J. O'Bwyer respectively deacon and aub-deacon, and tho Bev. S. T. Walsh master of ceremonies. It is needless to say that all the above, particularly his Lord ship, were very sorry that they could not assist at the obnequies of one of the oldest and moBt respected priests of the diocese. A report wat circulated here on Tuesday that small-pox had broken' out at Tumbarumba, Dr. Deans was telegraphed for late on Monday evening, and, though suffering from fatigue, be at one* started. On Tuesday the police at Tnmbarumba telegraphed for Dr. Agassis, of adelong. Ho also went to Tumbarumba. News has reaohed Tumut on Tuesday that two young people, relatives of Mr. Bartholomew, of our town, have died from typhoid fever, their deaths I understand, ooourred before the medical were Mat for. m it U presumed then are other cuee of a like oharaoter demanding the doctor's care. I do not give this as reliable information. The doctors are on their way home, when particulars oan be obtained, but thoy cannot arrive iu town until after the mail which oarries'this closes. [Further particulars regard this epidomio will be found in our telegrams. Ophthalmia !b very prevalent in this neigh borhood. - On Monday morning last we were visited with several heavy thundorshowers, and these proved fine refreshers ; sinoe thon we have enjoyed delightful weather. A first and only meeting iu the insolvent estate of Bobort Wilson takos placo hole on the 17th Fobruary noxt. Tenders have boon called for flooring the Exhibition building here. Also, for providing1 the windows with green venotiau shutters. Tenders are also required for removing a portion of the present fonce around tho ground, and for enclosing with a new fence, the additional area granted to the Association. These improve ments Bhould materially aid the success of tho noxt show. A land sale of several suburban lots takes place at the Court-house here on Wednesday, the 8th instant. Extensive bush fires have been raging at Brungle. I believe somo damage haabeen dona te Mr. Henry French's paddocks. The lightning on Monday^ morning ^trn^y ^ tree neat Mr. Whiting's place at Sharp's Creek, and fired the grass. The strong wind which, afterwards prevailed caused tho fire to burn furiously, and many persons were engaged alt the night endeavoring to prevent it spreading. The following selections were taken up at the Tumut Land-office on Thursday Feb. Si Bank N.S.W., 160a, Wagra, A. MoKinnon, 160a, Wagra S. McKinnon, 50a, Brungle H. Keenan, 40a, Batlow Jamos Harmor, 40a, Adjinbilly Christopher Graham, 100a, Adjinbilly James Day, 60a, Solwyn Thomas Fatton, ? Mingary Wm. Oakman, 60a, Courabyra Wm. Donnelly, 50a, Selwyn, George Paynter, 60a, Selwyn Samuel Basham, 40a, Hindmarsh F. Gurney, 100a, Adjinbilly G. K. Walkdon, 040a, Killimicat —Total, 1460a.