Gilmore Index

GILMORE

Index

Gilmore (Cootamundra-Tumut) After adjacent creek

Mr Back - " ? "

"Rosebank" Owners Index

Mr Thomas BOYD - "Jugyong" Explorer, lead a very eventfull life.

To Alexander Davis - "Woodlands"

To Walter Arnold Davis - "Burnside"

Mr Claffey "B"

Mr Murray

Mr George STURGESS "Bannenjoey"

Gilmore Public School

Mr John Stockwell

"Killarney", Windowie

Richard RIVERS - "Federal Park".

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavors have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact

John Stephenson or on 0431 481 451.

We hear terrible complaints of the totally impassable character of the road on the west bank of the Gilmore Creek, from Mr. Murray's homestead upwards past Mr. R. Marshall's. It is so bad at the present time as to be untraversible even on horseback. We trust our worthy Roads Engineer will send a maintenance man at once to repair it. - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 4 October 1910 Page 2).

TUMUT. (From Our Own Correspondent.) - A farewell and presentation was tendered Rev. and Mrs. A. Crowther Smith, in the Presbyterian Church on Thursday evening, prior to their departure for Goulburn. Dr. T. B. Clouston occupied the chair. Complimentary speeches and expressions of regret at the departure from Tumut of the guests were made by Misses C. Watson, T. N. Learmont. S. H. Nicholls, E. Watson and Dr. Clouston.

The latter handed Mr.and Mrs. Smith a wallet of notes from the Tumut Brungle end of the charge. Master Dick Quarmby, on behalf of the senior trail rangers, presented Rev. Smith with a set of military brushes and comb, and Master Archie Heydon, on behalf of the junior trail rangers, then handed Mr. Smith a bible as a mark of appreciation. Next Mrs. McGillivray, on behalf of the ladies' guild, presented Mrs. Smith with a silver cake-basket and fork as a token of love and esteem.

In a few well-chosen words Mrs. Smith returned thanks. On rising to respond, Mr. Smith was greeted with acclamation and his words listened to with interest. During the evening songs were rendered by Mr. E. Warren, Mrs F. Learmont, Mrs. Owen, Key Smith, Mr. Shearer and Mr and Mrs. Smith (duet).

Afterwards refreshment were, served by the ladies. Mr. and Mrs. Smith left by train last Thursday, to take up duties at Goulburn.

Mr. R. T. Hargreaves has disposed of his property at Mt. Hugel to Messrs. Grady Bros, of Sharp's Creek, together with all stock and plant.

- Mr and Mrs. Owen who have been in Tumut for sometime, have left Australia for their home in the north of Ireland.

The races held on Easter Monday, in aid of the town band were not a success. About 200 people attended, but the weather was most unpleasant and marred the proceedings.

A meeting of the Gilmore branch of the Agricultural Bureau was held on Tuesday night night at Mr. F. McAlister's residence. Mr. A. W. Davis, presided. A letter was received re the next annual conference of the bureau at Hawkesbury college, from 26th to 29th July. Mr. Allan Wilson was elected as the voting delegate for this branch; other delegates appointed were Messrs. M'Alister, Butler and Beattie.

The school garden competition was won by Pearl M'Alister, Edward Davis, Leslie Davis, and Clifford Davis. Messrs. A. Wilson and W. Bridle each promised to donate a pound of clover seed for the children's competitions. It was decided that an ugly man competition be organised to raise funds for the proposed ball, Mr. T. J. O 'Brien to represent the eastern side of Gilmore valley and Mr. Fred M'Alister the western side. At the conclusion of the meeting a presentation of a gold mounted fountain pen was made to the secretary, Mr. W. Bridle, as an appreciation of his services.

On Wednesday, Upper Gilmore school children held their picnic and the prizes were distributed by Mr. N. Harris, at the request of the teacher, Miss Wiolman. Results of the athletic events were:— Upper Division, championship (girls) — Thelma Harris. Lower Division, championship (girls) — Mary Sutton. Upper Division (boys) — T. Naughton. Lower Division (boys) — Noel Crampton. Sack Race (girls) — C. O' Sullivan. Sack Race (boys) — Ron Sutton. Three-legged Race (girls) — 0. O 'Sullivan and Thelma Harris; (boys), T. Naughton and Ron Sutton. Boot Jumble (boys) — Les Harris; (girls), C. O' Sullivan. Potato Race (boys) — T. Naughton; (girls), Thelma Harris. Trailing the Pig — Jean Back. School Handicap (boy3)— T. Naughton. (girls), M. Sutton. Married Ladies Race — Mrs. W. Callaway and Mrs. Herlihy, dead-heat. Infant's Race— 'Bob Harris'. Ex-students ' Race — Alma Sutton.

A Special service was held at All Saints' Church of England, Tumut, on Anzac Day, when Rev. Gn in delivered addresses to a large congregation. The diggers' annual dinner was held at the Globe Hotel on Monday night (Anzac Bay), Major Geoff Harris occupied the chair. A splendid dinner was provided. Empire colours, red, white and blue wore used for decorations. Various toasts were proposed by Dr. j Clouston, Capt. Colyer, Lieut. T. N. Learmonl, Capt. T. Phillips and Comrade Milton Archer. Songs were rendered by Comrade Laird and Comrade; Mark McAadam . Anecdotes were ve-j latecl'by Comrades Fraser and H. C. Wren, Lieut. J. D. H. Nieholl, T. N.' Learmont and H. Robinson, Captain Phillips and Dr. Clouston. The singing of 'Auld Lang Syne' brought proceedings to a close.

The death occurred recently of that old pioneer, Mr. William John Piper, sen, aged 84, at his residence, Bombowlee Creek. His wife predeceased him by a few years. These remain to mourn, William Edward, Arnold Francis; Leslie (Ingleburn), Mrs. Kemp (Sydney), Mrs. Harders (Ingleburn), Mrs. Graham M'Donnell (Tumut), and Mrs. Sam Bye (Bombowlee).

The death of Mrs Mary Ann Keown, wife, of Mr. Thomas Keown, occurred at the Randwiek Hospital on Good Friday. Deceased was 56 years of age and had been suffering for some time previous to leaving Tumut for treatment in Sydney. She leaves a husband, six children, viz.: Gus (war; hero), Jack, Fred, Frank, Mrs. Biteheri and Mrs. Butterfleld (Sydney), one daughter( Mrs. A. H. Guy) died about two months ago. Miss Burton, late of North Annandale, has been appointed sewing mistress at Tumut and Adelong District; schools. She commences duties after the holidays.

A meeting of the Micalong and District Dingo Destruction Association was held at the Royal Hotel on Saturday. Mr. S. G. Pearce occupied the chair. The secretary read out a list of land holders who had contributed to the funds, totalling £150. Mr. Elliot said the Pastures Protection Board had decided to subsidise the association funds, £ for £ up to £75 which would thus give them £225 to work on. Messrs. Feint and Bailey were appointed trappers. Mr. Feint to take part of the east and southern portion and Mr. Bailey the north and part of the eastern portion. During a football match between South Tumut and North, W. Dowling had his collarbone broken through a fall. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 6 May 1927 Page 41)

Contact John Stephenson on (Mobile 0431 481 451) Ex West Blowering Resident, now living in Wollongong, NSW. Australia.

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1903 - Lost in the Bush. OUT ALL NIGHT.

Our Gilmore correspondent furnishes us with particulars of a night's experience in the bush endured by a resident of that locality. Four young men, viz., James Back, A. Back, and T. and A. Connolly, went, with rifles, out last Sunday morning wallaby shooting.

They went over the hill towards Blowering and were on the West Blowering property in the evening, when some wallabies hove in sight lower down towards the river. Mr James Back essayed to go after them; but his companions demurred, thinking that it was too late, and as a heavy fog hung over the range they started for home. Jimmy, as he is colloquially known, went to have a shot at them, and it appears, tarried in the hope of shooting one, until the shades of ebon darkness surrounded him; and he immediately felt the impending danger of being unable to find his way home. Alas! such was the case; for he wandered about over hills, gullies, and through thick and dense scrub, but was unable to find any track to Gilmore. Luckily, however, he had matches, and he lit a large fire, and having two pairs of trousers on, he took off the outer pair which were very wet and placed them near the fire to dry. Being very tired, he soon surrendered himself a willing captive to the overtures of Somnus.

On awaking in the morning he found that his extra pair of trousers were almost completely burnt. It can be better imagined than described what consternation reigned in his home, for his father and mother felt sure that some accident must have befallen him.

GILMORE. THE DAIRYING INDUSTRY.

Almost every dairyman on Gilmore attended a meeting at Mr. J. T. Butler's cottage on Monday night of last week. There were 40 persons present, all keenly interested in what was about to be divulged in regard to Tumut Buttor Factory working and the complaints of suppliers, etc. .

Mr. Alex Davis was voted to the chair, and briefly introduced the Chairman of Directors of Tumut Co Operative Dairy Company (Mr. W. Hassett), also Mr. Hayden (manager) and Mr. T. Airey (secretary).

Mr. Hassett expressed pleasure at seeing such as splendid meeting, and, although he was expecting a volley of questions, he hoped, to answer all satisfactorily. They were all aware that the affairs of the company had become mixed and troublesome, but after a diligent search and a thorough investigation of all business affairs they had once more a clear beginning and, with a first class manager and secretary, he was sure they had already saved the company many hundreds of pounds, and, even though the manager was being well paid, he had quite justified his appointment. Mr. Hassett urged the suppliers to be patient, and if at any time they had a grievance they should lodge it in the right quarter; the "street-corner" was no place. It was not fair to the directors and they were not fair to themselves. The factory was their business, and all should be united in guarding its interests go in for a constructive policy, not a destructive one. It was a sad mistake to send cream out of this great district. The company was distributing £6000 a month within 20 miles of Tumut surely a marvellous achievement. Did they want to stop that flow of cash and lower the value of their properties and help to build up places like Cootamundra. The directors were not to blame for what had happened in the past. There had been some clever juggling with the books, and no one appeared to know just what did take place. Of course, they all had their own ideas. - As Chairman, he was out for a fair deal for all. His principles would be purely democratic, treating all alike. He was sure that all suppliers would be satisfied in future, and the next 12 months looked very prosperous for them all.

Mr. Young questioned in regard to a consignment of pigs, one being condemned as "yellow." All had been fed alike on maize and milk.

Mr. Hassett said they had little control over the pigs after they left here; they had a man to watch their interests in tho city and they simply had to abide by his report. He would do his best for Mr. Young, and have this matter referred to and ask the selling agents for an explanation.

Mr. M. J. Colyer: What is the maximum loss in the pig industry' in Australia?

Mr. Hassett had not the figures with him.

Mr. Colyer said he had been discourteously treated by the company in the past in regard to pig consignments.

Mr. Hassett assured Mr. Colyer that he knew nothing of that matter, and could promise him every consideration and courtesy in the future. If anything unpleasant had occurred he (Mr. Hassett) was not aware of it; otherwise he would have it investigated.

Messrs. P. Naughton, N. Harris and T. O'Brien complained of cream tests. In several instances the cream was exactly the same in quality and age, all taken from one can and sent to factory in separate cans. One was tested as choice and. the other as second-class.

Mr. Hayden said that could be possible by a faulty can, but all the same it was a most unusual occurrence and he had not had any similar cases since taking over the management. If such ever occurred again he would investigate immediately.

Mr. Airey gave what he termed a fair and open criticism of the affairs generally concerning the factory. He went thoroughly into the matter of finance, and assured his hearers that the future of the company was as bright as anything could possibly be. He spoke of the manager's capabilities and how he was effecting a saving of £850 to the company, through producing most butter which was not affecting the quality, but rather improving it. The public agreed on this point. He urged the suppliers to keep up the standard of their cream. It meant a greater name for the district and would balance the value of their properties. Land values should be £50 per acre in most parts of this fino district. What had happened on the North Coast could be done here. The early supply of cream at the factory was essential. Motor lorries should be used and controlled by the suppliers themselves, becauso it was their business, and they would run on time. They should not be later than 10 a.m. in summer. By coming late the company had to keep four men waiting and pay them overtime, which had amounted to £125 per month. This was a big item, and it was the share holders' concern to put an end to it.

If they pulled together the future for dairymen was even brighter than the wool and wheat men. Where he had been on the North Coast there were 240 suppliers and only three carted their own cream in light traps and they were quite close to the factory. A11 cream was in by 10 a.m. The result was choice cream and a great name for their butter and their district.

Mr Airey's address was particularly interesting and his delivery very fine.

Mr. Hayden said there was little left him him to say, as Mr. Airey had covered all the subjects he may have touched upon. The early delivery of cream was troubling him most, and he hoped for a better and more satisfactory delivery. He was anxious to assist the suppliers and if they had complaints he wished to hear them.

Mr Hassett here introduced Mr Dunlop, organising secretary of the Primary Producers' Union. He hoped for a patient hearing and was sure a branch could be formed here. Mr. Dunlop was not going to deliver a lengthy address as indicated by Mr. Hassett. He was suffering from a cold. They all knew fairly well what good work had been carried out by them and how they had fought the claims of the men on the land through the Arbitration Court. The dairymen had a lot to thank the P.P. Union for, especially for high prices of butter during war period. Farmers and graziers alike had also received many benefits and concessions too numerous for him to particularise. They had branches all over N.S.W. and one should be formed at Gilmore. If at any time they had a grievance needing attention the Union officials were at their command. The subscription fee was £1 per annum, of which 10/- went to head office and 10/- to the local branch. It was money well spent as their interests would always be guarded.

It was decided to form a branch at Gilmore. Mr. A. W. Davis sr. was appointed chairman (protem.) and Mr. W. Bridle as secretary (protem). Mr. P. S. Naughton was appointed delegate. Several names were handed in and soon the branch will "open fire" and get to business.

Votes of thanks to the various speakers and the ladies were carried in the usual manner. Refreshments were served by the Ladies. - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 16 June 1925 Page 3)

1903 - Lost in the Bush. OUT ALL NIGHT.

Our Gilmore correspondent furnishes us with particulars of a night's experience in the bush endured by a resident of that locality. Four young men, viz., James Back, A. Back, and T. and A. Connolly, went, with rifles, out last Sunday morning wallaby shooting.

They went over the hill towards Blowering and were on the West Blowering property in the evening, when some wallabies hove in sight lower down towards the river. Mr James Back essayed to go after them; but his companions demurred, thinking that it was too late, and as a heavy fog hung over the range they started for home. Jimmy, as he is colloquially known, went to have a shot at them, and it appears, tarried in the hope of shooting one, until the shades of ebon darkness surrounded him; and he immediately felt the impending danger of being unable to find his way home. Alas! such was the case; for he wandered about over hills, gullies, and through thick and dense scrub, but was unable to find any track to Gilmore. Luckily, however, he had matches, and he lit a large fire, and having two pairs of trousers on, he took off the outer pair which were very wet and placed them near the fire to dry. Being very tired, he soon surrendered himself a willing captive to the overtures of Somnus. On awaking in the morning he found that his extra pair of trousers were almost completely burnt. It can be better imagined than described what consternation reigned in his home, for his father and mother felt sure that some accident must have befallen him. Search parties were out nearly all night scouring the bush, but could find no trace of the missing one. Early on Monday morning a number of the neighbors set out to look, and about 9 o'clock they found 'Jimmy' making his way home, none the worse for his nights outing. - (Ref- Adelong and Tumut Express and Tumbarumba Post (NSW : 1900 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Friday 1 May 1903 Page 4).

We hear terrible complaints of the totally impassable character of the road on the west bank of the Gilmore Creek, from Mr. Murray's homestead upwards past Mr. R. Marshall's. It is so bad at the present time as to be untraversiblo even on horseback. We trust our worthy Roadsj Engineer will send a maintenance man at once to repair it. - (Ref- Adelong and Tumut Express and Tumbarumba Post (NSW : 1900 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Friday 28 September 1906 Page 3).

SUMMER COUNTRY - FRIDAY, the nth lNSr RALEIGH, AITKEN and Co , In conjunction with Pitt, Son, and Badgory of Sydney have received instructions to SELL by PUBLiC AUCTION, at Scotts Hotel, Melbourne, On MONDAY, the 25th OCTOBER,

The following properties -

SNUBBA RUN,

Known as head of Gilmore Creek, situated about 11 miles from Adelong. Snubba comprises an area of about 25,000 acres of splendid summer country, heavily grassed and well watered. It is fenced and subdivided Into five paddocks by chock and log, wire, and brush fencing

There is a good substantial cottage, good stable and garden, also eight acres under hay crop The homestead is situated on CP. land, of which there is about 1000 acres. - (Ref- The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 8 October 1884 Page 3).

AUCTION SALE. TUMUT DISTRICT, N.S.W. Rich Alluvial Flats, beautiful undulating country, suit able for Maize, Wheat and Dairying.

1702 ACRES/FREEHOLD. SUBDIVIDED into four 0 cM©fr-Farmsr^0HLY IMPROVED, ranging\from 272 Acres to 601 acres. AI RESIDENCE on each. Situ 1 ated within l\ mile from Gilmore Railway-station and 5£ miles from Tumut Butter Factory and Refrigerating Works, being the West portion of the well-known ROSEBANK - ESTATE Permanent Water.

Average rainfall 28J inches.

Inspection Confidently Invited Terms Most Liberal.

The undesigned have been favored with instructions from W. D. P. O'Brien, Esq, to sell by Public Auction, at Tumut, in O'BRIEN'S HALL, at 2,30 on WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27, 1911,

THE ABOVE. The Auctioneers beg to recommend this land to prospective buyers as a, SOUND INVESTMENT, and will be glad to show anyone wishing to inspect over the ground, and to supply any further information.

O. S. BYRNE, TUMUT, 8. T. DONALDSON, TUMBABUMBA, .Auctioneers in Conjunction, - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 5 September 1911 Page 3).