Samuel Clayton

Samuel CLAYTON father of Dr Benjamin CLAYTON arrived on the convict ship "SURRY"

THE TRIP TO AUSTRALIA

Samuel Clayton Details - Irish Rebel: - Religion: - Age on arrival: 33 - Marital status: - Calling/trade: Engraver miniature painter - Born: 1783 - Native place: Dublin City - Tried: 1815 - Dublin City - Sentence: 7 yrs - Former convictions: - Ship: Surrey I (2) [1816]. - (Ref- http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/cgi-bin/irish/irish.cgi?requestType=Search2&id=4222).

In 1816 the Surrey, commanded by Thomas Raine, sailed from London, departing Cork on 14 July and travelling via Rio de Janiero on 26 September reached Sydney after 159 days on 20 December with 150 male prisoners. The markedly improved treatment for the prisoners under the enlightened captaincy of Thomas Raine and the presence of naval surgeon John F Bayley were reflected by the safe arrival of all prisoners embarked. The Surrey returned to London via Batavia, Calcutta and Brazil.

The Surrey, or Surry, had an especially long career in the convict service and later as a trader, becoming one of the best-known vessels to visit Australia.

She was a typical convict vessel of the period. Built at Harwich in 1811, she was owned by the well-known London firm of Mangles. She was a fully square-rigged ship of 443 72/94 tons, with an overall length of 117 ft. 6 ins. and a breadth above the wales of 29 ft. 6 ins. Her draught when loaded was 18 ft., but when carrying prisoners and stores in 1816 she drew 16 ft. 3 ins. forward and 17 ft. 2 ins. aft, being down by the stern eleven inches. She was copper sheathed, and had quarter galleries, with a Minerva bust for a figurehead. As originally built, the Surrey had two decks with a height between decks of 5 ft. 8 ins., but was rebuilt about 1818 and from the following year is shown in the registers as having three decks. She rated for many years as a first-class ship built of first-class materials. (Bateson, 1959).

(Ref - http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Park/2283/vessels/surry.html)

Surry* (later referred to as the Surrey) Transport: 443 tons. Square rigged ship with an overall length of 117 ft. 6 ins., a breadth above the gunwales of 29 ft. 6 ins, and a draught, when loaded, of 18ft. The vessel was copper-sheathed, and had quarter galleries, with a Minerva bust for a figurehead. She carried a crew of thirty and was armed with fourteen cannons.

When the Surry was originally built at Harwich in 1811 she had two decks with a height between decks of 5ft. 8 ins. However, about 1818, she must have received a major refit - the Shipping Registers after 1819 record the vessel as having three decks.

The Surry had one of the longest careers as a convict transport and she was the only transport to make 11 passages to Australia. She completed her last voyage on reaching Hobart on 11 August 1842.

The Surry landed 2,177 male and female convicts in Australia and lost 51 men and one woman during her various passages, 36 of the men dying during her first and most notorious voyage in 1814 under the command of James Patterson.

Thomas Raine commanded her for the next three voyages (1816, 1819, 1823); he was succeeded by Charles Kemp for four voyages (1829, 1831, 1833, 1834); he was succeeded by George Sinclair as her Master on the ninth and tenth voyages (1836, 1840) and on the last voyage (1842) she was commanded by Henry Innott.

(Ref - http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/all/journeys/ships/list.html#s)

Surry or Surrey
A1/Ζ1 Ship/Barque; 461t.; 1811…c1849

Description: Ship, class A1 (1814), Ζ1 (1844), Ζ1 (1845…1846); barque class Ζ1 (1848). 14 guns. Crew of 30/32 men. 3-mast ship rig (Parsons, 1988). Two decks (1811…1818), three decks (1818+), Three tiers of beams. C1 D2. Sheathed in copper. Tonnage: 443 tons (1814); 461 tons (1844…1845); 461t (Parsons, 1988). Built: Harwich, 1811. Materials: 3 tier of ?ms. Dimensions: Length 117.5', breadth 29.5', depth 18'. [118'x29'11x6'9 (Parsons, 1988)]. Repairs: S.C (1814); NW.&TSds 27; ptF.&d. 38; ptd. 40; ND.&lrp 41; C. 41; F.&YM. 45; Srprs 45, 47. Registered: London. Home Port: London (1844…1845); Glasgow (1848); none (1849). Intention: London - NSW (1814); London - Granada (1844…1845); ?hrd - Singapore (1845); none (1846); Clyde - Quebec (1848). Owner(s): Mangles (1814); ?James Smith; Herring & Co (1844…1845); R Aikman (1845…1849). Master(s): James Paterson (1814); Thomas Raine (1814…1816); Keyser (1844…1845); J Scott (1848). Surgeon Supt(s): Fate: Unknown. Last listed [LR] 1849. After 1801 conditions aboard convict transports seemed to improve, with prisoners generally treated more humanely, and fewer dying or landed sick. However in 1814 three vessels, the General Hewart, Three Bees and Surrey voyaged with heavy loss of life, and the rest sick and emaciated and generally suffering the ravages of scurvy and typhus.

The Surrey, as a convict transport, departed England on 22 February 1814, and after a stop in Rio arrived in Sydney on 27 July 1814, accompanied by the Broxbornebury which berthed next day. For this voyage of 156 days, which was to attract great public and official attention, the Surrey embarked 200 male convicts, transported under the Plymouth court's instruction dated 7 February 1814. Thirty-six of the convicts were to die on board of Infections and malignant fever (typhus), together with the Surgeon, First and Second Mates, Boatswain, two seamen and four of the guard. James Patterson, the master, died after arrival in Sydney; Thomas Raine, a junior officer, succeeded to the command.

Upon arrival, all survivors were placed under a strict quarantine, with those infected encamped on the north shore of Port Jackson where they remained until 18 August. The convicts were then brought across to Sydney, inspected and distributed as a labour force amongst the free settlers. The official report of the Board of Enquiry headed by the colony's Assistant Surgeon Redfern (himself a transportee) ascribed blame to neglect by the Master and Surgeon. The accompanying Broxbornebury suffered only two deaths amongst its 120 female convicts, which was not unusual for such a voyage.

Amongst the transportees on the Surrey was Robert Cross, convicted for burglary in Yorkshire Assizes on 31 July 1813 and sentenced to death by hanging, commuted to life imprisonment which, for transportees, was generally served as fourteen years labour in Australia. Robert's wife Jane, with their three children, travelled as "Free Settlers" aboard the Broxbornebury, and commenced an interesting life association with fellow passenger John Horsley, though always in apparently amiable contact with Robert.

The Surrey sailed on for China on 8 November, under Thomas Raine. Redfern's report to Governor Macquarie urged the appointment of naval surgeons to the transports, and the provision of an assistant surgeon. This report probably served to confirm the action by the Transport Commissioners in appointing naval surgeons to the transports, Joseph Arnold sailing from England on the Northampton on 2 January 1815.

In 1816 the Surrey, commanded by Thomas Raine, sailed from London, departing Cork on 14 July and travelling via Rio de Janiero on 26 September reached Sydney after 159 days on 20 December with 150 male prisoners. The markedly improved treatment for the prisoners under the enlightened captaincy of Thomas Raine and the presence of naval surgeon John F Bayley were reflected by the safe arrival of all prisoners embarked. The Surrey returned to London via Batavia, Calcutta and Brazil.

The Surrey, or Surry, had an especially long career in the convict service and later as a trader, becoming one of the best-known vessels to visit Australia.

She was a typical convict vessel of the period. Built at Harwich in 1811, she was owned by the well-known London firm of Mangles. She was a fully square-rigged ship of 443 72/94 tons, with an overall length of 117 ft. 6 ins. and a breadth above the wales of 29 ft. 6 ins. Her draught when loaded was 18 ft., but when carrying prisoners and stores in 1816 she drew 16 ft. 3 ins. forward and 17 ft. 2 ins. aft, being down by the stern eleven inches. She was copper sheathed, and had quarter galleries, with a Minerva bust for a figurehead. As originally built, the Surrey had two decks with a height between decks of 5 ft. 8 ins., but was rebuilt about 1818 and from the following year is shown in the registers as having three decks. She rated for many years as a first-class ship built of first-class materials. (Bateson, 1959).

3. Rebuilt and now with three decks the Surrey departed Sheerness 29 September 1818 and England on 17 October, sailing via Rio to reach Port Jackson on 4 March 1819, 156 days out from Sheerness. Surgeon Matthew Anderson. The Surrey had embarked 160 male prisoners, of whom three died on the voyage. Seven were landed in Port Jackson before the Surrey sailed on, reaching Van Diemen's Land on 18 March, 152 days after leaving England, and disembarking the remaining 150 prisoners. She returned to Port Jackson from the Derwent about 21 April with general cargo, remaining for three months before setting sail for London on 23 July. She took with her detachments of the 84th and 48th Regiments, and a cargo of hides, whale and seal oil, sealskins, wool, coconut oil and tan.

4. NSW's Governor Lachlan Macquarie sailed to England aboard the Surry, as she was commonly spelt, on 15 February 1822.

5. Departed Portsmouth 5 October 1822, sailing direct to Port Sydney which she reached on 4 March 1823, after a passage of 150 days. Surgeon Charles Linton took charge of the 160 male prisoners, with the records showing 157 landed in Sydney.

6. Now 461 tons and classed E1, the Surrey departed London mastered by Charles Kemp and with Henry G Brock as surgeon on 11 August 1829, arriving 125 days later in HobartTown on 14 December. On this voyage 200 male transportees were embarked, all but one surviving the voyage.

7. Mastered by Charles Kemp and with surgeon Colin A Browning, the Surrey sailed from Portsmouth on 17 July 1831, and after a passage of 132 days reached Port Jackson on 26 November. All but one of the 200 male prisoners embarked survived the voyage.

8. Left the Downs on 4 December 1832 mastered by Charles Kemp, with surgeon David Wyse. Arrived HobartTown 124 days later on 7 April 1833. Supposedly 204 male prisoners had been embarked, though despite one reported death en route 204 were apparently landed alive in Van Diemen's Land.

9. Now classed Ζ1, the Surrey exited Plymouth 7 April 1834 and 132 days later reached Port Jackson on 17 August. Still mastered by Kemp, her surgeon was John Smith. On this voyage the Surrey conveyed all 260 embarked male prisoners safely to Sydney.

10. The Surrey sailed from Cork on 9 January 1836, taking 129 days to reach Port Jackson on 17 May. Her new master was George Sinclair, and her surgeon Thomas Robertson. Five of the 229 male convicts aboard died on the voyage, two were re-landed, the remaining 224 reaching Sydney safely.

11. Transporting female convicts on her 1840 voyage only, the Surrey sailed direct from the Downs on 2 April with 213 prisoners, reaching Port Jackson on 13 July, 102 days out. Sinclair was still master, and accompanied on this voyage by surgeon Ed. Leah. One prisoner died on this voyage, the remainder landed safely in Sydney.

12. On her last voyage as a convict transport, the Surrey sailed from Downs to HobartTown via the Cape, departing 5 April 1842 and arriving 128 days later on 11 August. Her master now was Henry I Naylor, her surgeon John Tarn. Three of the 250 male prisoners embarked died during the passage, 247 being delivered to the authorities in HobartTown.

13. The Surry arrived in Port Adelaide 11 October 1838 from London. Migrants who travelled in this vessel formed a township on the road to Onkaparinga SA which they named Surryville. [Parsons, 1988, says the Surrey also conveyed convicts in 1848].

Thomas Raine, one of the colonies better known masters, is buried in Camperdown Cemetery. Between 1814 and 1836, Raine captained the Surrey in 40 voyages. He opened Australia's first whaling station, at Eden on the New South Wales south coast, in 1828. He was the first to ship Australian cedar overseas.

[The 1825 Quebec-built A1 barque Surrey made one voyage to Australia as a convict transport, departing Cork on 5 November 1832 and reaching Port Jackson direct on 9 March 1833, a voyage of 124 days.]

CLAYTON, Samuel. Per "Surrey", 1816; engraver

1817 Engraver of Sydney. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3175; 4/1850 p.59)

1820 Oct 5 Juror at inquest on unknown man held at Sydney (Reel 6021; 4/1819 pp.3-4)

1821 Jan 29 Memorial of his son Benjamin (Fiche 3001; 4/1821 No.24)

1822 Mar 9 Recommended petition of Henry McKean, William Tyson and other convicts at the Prisoners' Barracks for permission to perform a play (Reel 6052; 4/1752 p.31a)

1824 Sep 20 Affidavits re his marriage to Jane Lofthouse (Reel 6028; 2/8305 pp.95-8)

1825 May 9 Signature in recommendation of Thomas William Middleton's memorial re retaining the situation of Inspector of Cattle (Reel 6062; 4/1782 p.48c)

1825 Jul 13 Warrant on the Colonial Treasurer for brass seals supplied to the Excise Department (Reel 6070; 4/6037 p.35)

1825 Nov 26 Memorial (Fiche 3124; 4/1840C No.130 pp.725-30). Reply, 30 Nov (Reel 6016; 4/3516 p.57)

1825 Nov 30 On list of persons who have received orders for grants of land (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.87)

(Ref - Colonial Secretary Index, 1788-1825)

1818 - CERTIFICATE OF PARDON - CLAYTON, Samuel - Surrey 1816 - CP 31 Jan 1818 [4/4430] 774 - 120 - (Ref- http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au/indexsearch/searchhits.aspx?table=Index to Convict Pardons&ID=21&query=clayton&frm=0).

1824 - CERFIICALE OF FREEDOM - CLAYTON, Samuel - Surry 1816 - 200/2790 - 29 Sep 1824 - Certificate of Freedom - [4/4423; - Reel 601]- CP 1040 - (Ref- http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au/indexsearch/searchhits.aspx?table=Convict+Index&ID=65&query=clayton&frm=0).

1838 - CSreLand - 2/7826 1110 CLAYTON, Samuel 1829 1838

TIME LINE

1835 - Anti-Transportation League founded in Sydney.

1835 - A land route opened from Sydney to Port Phillip.

1835 – Wollongong’s first Court House was erected.

1835 – Archbishop John Bede Polding arrived as first Roman Catholic Bishop of Australia (13/9/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Henry Porcher (1/1/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Royal Admiral (22/1/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Bengal Merchant (30/1/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Forth (3/2/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Lady Kennaway (4/3/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Lady Nugent (9/4/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Siren (9/4/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Clorinda (12/5/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Resource (20/5/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Marquis of Huntley (5/7/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Westmoreland (15/7/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Currency Lass (29/7/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Hero (31/8/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Mary (6/9/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship England (28/9/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Blackwell (29/9/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Mary Ann (26/10/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Lady Macnaughten (26/10/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Warrior (20/11/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Royal Sovereign (12/12/1835).

1835 – Arrival of convict ship Hive (10/12/1835).

Names of ships arriving in 1835

Blackwell transported 150 male Irish convicts

Bengal Merchant (2) transported 19 male Irish convicts

Clorinda transported 7 male Irish convicts

Currency Lass transported only 2 male Irish convicts

England (3) transported 9 male Irish convicts

Forth (3) transported 196 male Irish convicts

Henry Porcher (2) transported 5 male Irish convicts

Hero transported 199 male Irish convicts

Hive (2) transported 250 male Irish convicts

Lady Kennaway (1) transported 32 male Irish convicts

Lady McNaughten transported 300 male Irish convicts

Lady Nugent (1) transported 19 male Irish convicts

Marquis of Huntley (4) transported 13 male Irish convicts

Mary Anne II transported 12 male Irish convicts

Mary III (5) transported 27 female Irish convicts

New York Packet transported only 1 male Irish convict

Royal Admiral (3) transported 203 male Irish convicts

Royal Sovereign (2) transported 8 male Irish convicts

Siren transported 4 male Irish convicts

Warrior transported 9 male Irish convicts

Westmoreland (1) transported 7 male Irish convicts

(Ref - http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/ships.htm)

To Dr Benjamin CLAYTON

1873 - ON Wednesday lost (eaya tho Yass Courier), Mr Sub mspoctor Brounun, in his capacity of local mspoctor of distilleries, made a soiruro, on bohnlf of tho Crown, of a diiiyloud of spirits, wino, Ώo It oppoois that Mr George Rojnolds, of Baltinglass, near Gunning, is licensed to distil blandy to foitifj the wines mude in his oxtonsivo vinoyaid, und on Wednoedaj Mi Brennan, about seven miles on tho Yass aido of Gunning, and on tho room southorn road, como upon a largo and well built doublo waggon, tiltod ovoi, und drawn by six valuable horses, the dnvor ndinΏ upono seventh horse On on quumgas to tho contents of tho waggon tho inspector was informed that it was wino, en louie to a station posscssod by Mr Roynolds "down tho river" Mr Brennan, however, boil his doubtB on tho subject, mid was about to broach a cask oi two with a gimlot, winch hy lomo means was nt hand, when ho was told it woa " no uso, os thoro was brandy as well as wino on tho waggon " It was then discoi ored that thero woro seven 35 gallon casks of brandy, of unusual strength, and scvon 35 gallon casks of colonial wine m tho load, which, togethot with tho waggon, sovon horses, and other property, woro at once do clared to bo confiscated, and taken back to Gun- ning, vvhoro tho wholo was givon into the safo keeping ol tho police lho \uluo of tho pro- perty soizod oxoeods £500 and, in addition, Mr Roynolds' two Burotios arc hkoly to bo called upon to pay £100 each for his having infringed the con- ditions of his license Tho property romains at Gunning, awaiting instructions from MrLums darno, tho chief inspcctoi of distillerios. - (Ref- The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 23 September 1873).

Five Dollars Reward. STRAYED from the Neighbourhood of