Atkinson

~Goobraganda~

Mr Atkinson

Records show that Mr William Atkinson (Sen) Mr Atkinson was a very early land owner in the area.

1936 - Shot While Rabbiting - TUMUT, (NSW.), Sunday. - Parties who have been searching since Friday afternoon for Laurence Piper, aged 27 years, who failed to return after going rabbit-shooting on his uncle's property at Bombowlee Creek, found his body, with the head nearly blown off, yesterday. A I single-barrelled shotgun was alongside the body. It Is believed that Piper was getting through a fence when the gun was accidentally discharged. The deceased was a son of Mr. I. Piper, of Goobragandra Station. - (Ref- The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956)(about) Previous issue Monday 17 August 1936).

1936 - FATAL SHOOTING ACCIDENT.TUMUT, Monday. - Laurence Sidney Piper, 29, son of Israel Piper, manager of Goobragandra Station, was killed while out shooting. His body was found half way through a fence in the bed of Bombowlee Creek, with frightful head injuries, a charge of shot having entered the side of the head. Death was apparently instantaneous. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 18 August 1936).

ANOTHER PIONEER PASSES - Mr. Christopher Graham, aged 81 years, of Little River Station Tumut (Adelong district) died last Saturday. He was smitten by a paralytic stroke and was brought into hospital by his son, Mr. Harry Graham, who manages his property, but from the outset no hopes were held for his recovery. The late Mr. Christopher Graham belonged to that sturdy band of men who blazed the track and opened up inland I Australia.

He was a native of Yn-- I being the second son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Harry Graham. His father was a cooper by trade, but hu ,son, Christopher, early in. life went on the land and later selected under the Sir John Robertson Act at Argalong, afterwards taking up grazing areas on the Little (Goobragandra) River, where he resided for the rest of his long life.

He married Emma Harris, a daughter of one of the early settlers of Lacmalac, the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harris, in all Saints Church, Tumut, and to them were born five sons and four daughters. ,The sons were James (reported missing at Great War), Henry and Ernest (Tumut), Albert (Qld.), and Christo pher (Wagga), and daughters Janie (Mrs. J. Smith, Cooma), Elsie (Mrs. Carter, North Coast), Alice (Mrs. Reynolds, Cootamundra) and Ivy (Mrs. Miller, Wagga), all of whom survive.

The only brother alive is Mr. James Graham, of Bongongo station, who is in his 86th year. The late Mr. Graham was the soul of honor in all his dealings, an agreeable neighbor and of a very, kindly disposition. His wife predeceased him. His son, Mr. Harry Graham, who continued to live with his parents after all the rest of the family had left the parental roof, assisted in the management of the property and he and his good wife attended to his father's every want during the illnesses that beset him in his declining years. There are 30 grand children and one great grandchild. The remains were taken to All Saints' Church on Sunday, and after a short service conducted by the Rector, Rev, S. Broadfoot, the burial took place in the Church of England portion of the Tumut new cemetery. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 10 June 1938 Page 46).

ANOTHER PIONEER PASSES

Mr. Christopher Graham, aged 81 years, of Little River Station, Tumut (Adelong district) died last Saturday. He was smitten by a paralytic stroke and was brought into hospital by his son, Mr. Harry Graham, who manages his property, but from the outset no hopes were held for his recovery. The late Mr. Christopher Graham belonged to that sturdy band of men who blazed the track and opened up inland Australia.

He was a native of Yass, being the second son of the late Mr and Mrs. James Harry Graham. His father was a cooper by trade, but his son Christopher, early in life went on the land and later selected under the Sir John Robertson Act at Argalong, afterwards taking up grazing acres on the Little (Goobragandra) River, where he resided for the rest of his long life.

He married Emma Harris, a daughter of one of the early settlers of Lacmalac, the late Mr and Mrs Thomas Harris, in all Saints Church, Tumut, and to them were born five sons and four daughters.

Five sons were James (reported missing at Great War),

Henry and Ernest (Tumut),

Albert (Qld.),

Christopher (Wagga), and daughters

Janie (Mrs. J. Smith, Cooma),

Elsie (Mrs. Carter, North Coast),

Alice (Mrs. Reynolds, Cootamundra) and

Ivy (Mrs. Miller, Wagga), all of whom survive.

The only brother alive is Mr. James Graham, of Bongongo station, who is in his 86th year. The late Mr. Graham was the soul of honor in all his dealings, an agreeable neighbor and of a very, kindly disposition. His wife predeceased him. His son, Mr. Harry Graham, who continued to live with his parents after all the rest of the family had left the parental roof, assisted in the management of the property and he and his good wife attended to his father's every want during the illnesses that beset him in his declining years.

There are 30 grand children and one great grandchild. The remains were taken to All Saints' Church on Sunday, and after a short service conducted by the Rector, Rev, S. Broadfoot, the burial took place in the Church of England portion of the Tumut new cemetery. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 10 June 1938 Page 46).

Another pioneer of the Tumut and Adelong districts, Mr Michael C. Mulvihill, aged 77 years, died in the Tumut District Hospital last Monday.

Deceased became seriously ill about a fortnight ago, senile decay having set in and his case was hopeless from his entry into hospital. He was the elder son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mulvihill, of Racecourse Farm, and was a native of the district. He started his career in lite on his father's farm, then went to Queensland for a few years, returning to Tumut and remained for five or six years engaged in market gardening.

The wanderlust caught him when the gold fever of West Australia was at its height and Mick, with a mate, Jack Sheahan hied thither, but, instead of gold seeking they were on the great waterworks then being constructed from Perth to Kalgborlie. About 18 years ago, when the glamor of the West had died out Mr. Mulvihill came back to Tumut and reengaged in his old job of market gardening, which he contiuued to follow until taken to hospital, his old mare and vegetable cart being well known figures in the main streets of Tumut. He was a genial man, with a happy go lucky nature, a jovial quip for all and sundry who hailed or whom he hailed, and was particularly popular with his customers for his more than fair dealings.

He was a bachelor. Those who survive him are: Sisters Mary (Mrs. George Danvers), Miss Johanna and Ellen (Mrs. Lees), all of Sydney, and brother Thomas H. (of Racecourse Farm, Tumut), Katie .(Mrs R. Frewin), Aggie (Mrs. Jas. Connors), and Jack (killed at Cowra) predeceased him.

The funeral took place this week, a large cortege following the hearse to the sepulchre in the Roman Catholic potrion of the Tumut new cemetery. Very Rev Dean Sharkey conducting the obsequies at the grave side. The pallbearers were Messrs. Tom Connors, M. Mulvihill, Robt. Connors, Tom Mulvihill (nephews), Matt. Downing and Thos. C. Mulvihill (brother).- (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 10 June 1938 Page 46).

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

Click To Home